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Friday, 17 November 2017 13:03

1-2-1 Mentoring

Age: 10-17
Sex:  N/A
Cost:  Yes

 

Aims:

  • One to one mentoring to tackle the root causes of offending and reoffending
  • Engaging clients whose social exclusion, sense of powerlessness and sense of entitlement make them vulnerable to gang culture and criminal activity
  • Encourage positive lifestyle choices, by challenging and changing attitudes and values that contribute to entrenchment in a gang lifestyle

 

Description:

Spark2Life have developed an 8-10 weeks package of 1-hour sessions of holistic person-centered mentoring aimed at gang involved offenders and ex-offenders aimed at 13-18-year-old with complex needs.

Each mentoring relationship starts with an initial assessment which, looks at the individual’s needs, circumstances and motivations.

The package includes 6 main sessions -

  1. Gangs,
  2. Risk and Reward
  3. Managing Conflict
  4. React or Respond
  5. Triggers
  6. There’s more in you

The package of support can be tailored to fit the individual’s needs by supplementary mentoring sessions covering:

  • Emotional intelligence
  • Paradigm shifting
  • Personality types, learning styles, strengths and weaknesses
  • Personal development and personal goals.
  • Relationships (parents, carer)
  • Friendship circles
  • Career aspirations
  • Education, training and Employment

Spark2life have been working with Barking and Dagenham YOT (since 2010)  Havering YOT (since 2012) Waltham Forest YOT(since 2012) and Newham YOT (2017)

 

Implementing the Practice:

The S2L AQA accredited mentors meets the client in a safe environment. An initial assessment will be made, and the mentor will focus on building a relationship and discovering what the young person’s skills and interests are.

Mentors use the Spark2life networks of employment, training and apprenticeship providers (which include City Gateway, Department for Work and Pensions, Crisis, Peabody, St Giles) in the following sectors - construction, electrical engineering, catering, sports and Leisure, the motor industry to name a few. to offer the young person the following opportunities

  • CV writing skills
  • Developing good interview techniques,
  • Support in applying for apprenticeships and jobs.

S2L provide YOT worker with detailed weekly case notes covering the 1-21 session content, aims and objectives,

S2L monitor each young person’s response to the session, staff member and engagement reporting back to YOT (via CJSM) with case notes

S2L meet with the YOT coordinator for a quarterly report on the 1-2-1 Mentoring contract

 

Contacts:

Source Organisation:  Spark2life
Name:  Melvyn Naidoo
Telephone:  0208 619 1355
E-mail:  melvyn@spark2life.co.uk 
Website:  www.spark2life.co.uk
YOT:  Havering Youth Offending Service
Name:  Matthew Knights
Telephone:  01708 433720 
E-mail:  matthew.knights@havering.gov.uk 
Thursday, 01 September 2016 13:08

Case Management and Diversity Panel

Age: 10-17
Sex: n/a
Cost: none

 

 

Aims:

  • The Panel is designed to support the management and reduction of risk through the delivery of targeted intervention planning
  • The panel is designed to promote multi-agency information sharing and decision
  • The panel is designed to provide an additional level of management oversight.
  • The panel is designed to ensure all areas of diversity are reflected within the planning and delivery of interventions

 

 

Description:

The Case Management and Diversity Panel has been set up to ensure that management and reduction of risk by and to young people is monitored through targeted intervention planning, with a multi-agency approach.

The young people that are presented at the panel are all DYO cases and MAPPA cases, young people that have been assessed as posing a high or very high risk to others or self, custody cases as well as young people identified by the Police as exhibiting escalating or concerning behaviour as well as caretaking/transfer case.

The emphasis of the Panel is for the core members to identify appropriate referrals to their own specialist services and identify actions to address all risk domains.
Key diversity issues, are also identified and discussed. All cases are reviewed by the panel and tracked in supervision by the relevant team manager.

The panel, can be resource intensive due to mandatory attendance of all specialist staff, DYO, case managers etc. and is also chaired by service manager.

 

 

Contact:

YOT: Leicester Youth Offending Service
Name: Karen Manville
Telephone: 0116 4544600
Email: Karen.Manville@leicester.gov.uk 



Published in Resources For Sharing
Wednesday, 26 October 2016 10:17

Ether Programme (Wipers)

Age: 10-17
Sex: male
Cost: yes
Level:

 

 

Aim:

  • Support young people from BAME background to increase personal development and leadership skills

 

 

Description:
The Programme is 8 weeks long, with each session lasting 90 minutes. The Programme is targeted specifically at young black, Asian and ethnic minority males. Some of the core components of the Programme include:

  • Identity and perception of self
  • Self-esteem and confidence
  • Attitude and behaviour
  • Independent thinking

Wipers run the programme on behalf of the Service, on site (or where deemed appropriate) and also complete pre and post questionnaires with young people to track any changes.
You can access video testimonials from young people that attended the Ether Programme here. Both Hammersmith and Fulham YOS and Camden YOT overall have both received positive feedback from the young people and staff around the programme.

 

 

Implementing the practice:

  • Camden YOT have a Session Worker that attend together with the Wipers team to support and co-facilitate the Ether sessions. The staff that attends from the YOT is a staff member that is also from a BAME background, in keeping with the ethos of the programme
  • Camden YOT pay for the programme, which runs on average twice yearly, via the YOT budget
  • Hammersmith and Fulham, also commission the training through the YOT budget as well as match funding opportunity with Wipers
  • At Camden YOT, staff from Wipers attend a pre-interview with the young people that have been referred to the programme to ensure suitability and support positive engagement
  • Hammersmith and Fulham YOS also have a member of staff that liaises and co-facilitates with Wipers, however the person is rotated based on availability of staff

Wipers, complete an evaluation at the end of the programme with the Services and provide that information

 


Contact:

YOT: Hammersmith and Fulham YOS
Name: Alison Sabaroche
Telephone: 020 8753 4602
Email: alison.sabaroche@lbhf.gov.uk


YOT: Camden YOT
Name: Arthur Waters
Telephone: 020 7974 5457
Email: arthur.waters@camden.gov.uk


 

Source Organisation: Wipers
Name: Sammy Odoi
Email: sammy@wipers.org.uk
Web:
https://www.wipers.org.uk/


  
  

Friday, 11 August 2017 13:07

Ethnic Disproportionality Tool

The Ethnic Disproportionality Tool is an Excel spreadsheet that provides information about how members of all ethnic groups, including those from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups, were represented in the Youth Justice System in England and Wales in the years ending March 2012 to March 2016. The aim of the tool is to support YOTs in addressing any issues of over-representation of particular ethnic groups in their local youth justice systems.

 

The Tool has four sections; including

  1. Table showing the number and proportion of young people who received a youth caution or court conviction broken down by ethnicity for the period year ending March 2012 to year ending March 2016
  2. Chart showing the proportion of young people who received a youth caution or court conviction broken down by ethnicity for the period year ending March 2016 compared with the ethnic breakdown of the local 10-17 population
  3. Statistical tool which identifies whether a particular ethnic group is over-represented in the youth offending cohort and if the level of over-representation is statistically significant according the significance level defined
  4. Charting showing trends in percentage point difference between the proportions of representation of each ethnic group in the offending population with the proportion of representation in the 10-17 population

Please note that only staff that work in a YOT are able to access the toolkit. This can be done from the Document Library on the Youth Justice Application Framework (YJAF). If you have any problems accessing the toolkit on YJAF please contact the YJB Information and Data Team:  informationandanalysis@yjb.gsi.gov.uk


The data is drawn from the Youth Justice Application Framework (YJAF) data based on YOT quarterly returns to the YJB, and from 2011 census.

 

In 2014 and 2015, as part of its work to tackle ethnic disproportionality within the justice system, the Youth Justice Board (YJB) developed and piloted a Case Level Ethnic Disproportionality Toolkit with 20 youth offending teams (YOTs).  The toolkit allowed YOTs to undertake a detailed level analysis of ethnic disproportionality in their local area.

In 2017, the Lammy Review, recommended that the YJB commission an evaluation of what had been learned from the trial of the Case Level Ethnic Disproportionality Toolkit, and identify potential actions or interventions to be taken (Recommendation 33).  This evaluation was undertaken in response to that recommendation. The findings and lessons from it are informing the development and future rollout of a new revised Local Ethnicity Disproportionality tool.  

Published in Knowledge and Evidence
Friday, 17 November 2017 17:01

Group Mentoring

Age: 10-17
Sex:  N/A
Cost  Yes

 

Aims:

  • Encourage team building and facilitate peer to peer mentoring in a controlled space. 
  • Challenging a value system supporting a crime and gang culture
  • Encouraging positive lifestyle choices
  • Promote strength and benefits of living in a diverse culture

 

Description:

Spark2Life’s (S2L) approach is based on meaningful mentoring - building trust with the group, promoting a team culture across the group, creating a safe and secure environment and good aftercare and support to mentees.

Spark2life have been working with the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham (LBBD) Youth Offending Team (YOT) since 2010 and have worked with several other YOT’s in other London Boroughs.

Key features of the Mentoring Programme –

  • S2L staff have been trained through our holistic mentoring Programme and specifically on identifying the personality type and learning styles of themselves and their mentees
  • We have worked in a group mentoring format (maximum 10 people to a group) on a weekly basis with approximately 140 young people aged between 13-18 who were on Intensive Supervision Surveillance (SS)
  • Our one hour interactive sessions cover a range of topics such as: What are our triggers: Healthy communication: React or Respond; Leadership skills; Confidence building
  • Where necessary, we devise bespoke sessions for the group

We facilitate male and female group mentoring in Pupil Referral Units (PRU)’s

 

Implementing the Practice:

As of 2016, 2 hours on Saturday was added to this contract. From 2016 these sessions operated without the presence of the Youth Offending Team (YOT) worker and was monitored by the S2L worker emailing weekly case notes via secure email (CJSM).

  • S2L provide YOT worker with detailed weekly case notes covering the group session content, aims and objectives,
  • S2L monitor each young person’s response to the session, staff member and engagement reporting back to YOT via with case notes
  • After each session, young people compete feedback questioners on the session
  • S2L meet with the LBBD YOT coordinator for a quarterly report on the Group Mentoring Programme

 

Contacts:

Source Organisation: Spark2life
Name: Melvyn Naidoo
Telephone: 0208 619 1355
E-mail: melvyn@spark2life.co.uk
Website: www.spark2life.co.uk
YOT: Barking and Dagenham YOT
Name: Robert Harris
Telephone: 0208 2273690
E-mail: robert.harris@lbbd.gov.uk
Published in Practice Examples
Tuesday, 12 July 2016 11:17

Heritage Panel

Age: 10-17
Sex: n/a
Cost: none

 

 

Aims:

  • The Panel will provide a forum to ensure that the specific needs of BME young people are promptly and specifically identified and recorded within the Care/Action Plan
  • The Panel will monitor the progress of Care/Action Plans

 

 

Description:
The Looked After Children’s Heritage Panel has been set up to promote positive and relevant social work practice and resources in relation to meeting the needs of Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) children and young people who are looked after by the Local Authority.

The children who fall under the purview of the Panel are BME young people who are cared for by the Local Authority’s own Young People’s Residential Homes (YPRH’s) and Foster Placements; or commissioned by the Local Authority i.e. external Residential and Foster Placements, and Secure Accommodation.

Information will be fed back via the Extended Senior Management Team (ESMT) to promote resources, and to inform future policy and planning in Children's Services.

 

 

Contact:

YOT: Leicester Youth Offending Service
Name: Karen Manville
Telephone: 0116 4544600
Email: Karen.Manville@leicester.gov.uk 

 

 





 

Published in Resources For Sharing
Thursday, 15 December 2016 16:09

Heritage Project

Age: 10-17
Sex: n/a
Cost: n/a

 

 

Aims:

  • To give young people the opportunity to explore their heritage and roots
  • To give young people an opportunity to learn about various cultures as well as an improved sense of identity

 

 

Description:

This is a Heritage Lottery funded project in which young people explore their roots and heritage through various methods. The project was for one year and has included trips to the archive service, local libraries, desktop research, oral history interviews, and cooking sessions. To introduce young people to the project they were asked to create a family tree and from there a conversation took place regarding their interests and how this may have linked to British society or values of another culture. From then the activity the young person engaged with depended on their interest and intensity of their order. Some young people attended oral history training sessions, others went to the archives service and conducted research, some made flags, and some just had a discussion with a case manager and contributed to a brochure.

 

Throughout the project various materials have been produced which will be displayed in an exhibition. This includes a brochure, recipe book, posters, and flags, demonstrating what has been learnt thought the lifetime of the project.

 

This has given young people an opportunity to learn about various cultures as well as their own, helping to provide them with a sense of identity. It has provided a positive activity for them to be involved with, and a safe environment for them to express their views and perspectives. It has also provided staff with the knowledge of various cultures and the impact it may have on young people, as well as how the differences in culture may cause conflicting values for the young people. It is a new way to get young people to engage constructively, and the topic of culture and identity has been adopted within group and one to one sessions.

 

All materials produced as part of the project will be displayed in an exhibition touring the local libraries in Sandwell.

 

 

Implementing the Practice:

  • The project has included one on one sessions with young people as well as group work
  • The project has allowed for regular consideration of culture and heritage
  • This project fits well with wider work being done around disproportionality and over-representation

 

 

Contact:

YOT: Sandwell Youth Offending Team
Name: Michael Botham
Telephone: 01215692201                  
Email: michael_botham@sandwell.gov.uk
Published in Practice Examples
Thursday, 13 February 2020 16:55

Improving Parental Engagement Report, MoJ (2020)

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has produced the attached report ‘Improving Parental Engagement’ on the experiences of parents of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) children in the youth justice system.

Agencies are encouraged to consider this document as an assurance tool to better understand the needs of parents with BAME children in the system. The report includes suggestions for Youth Offending Teams on what might work in better engaging and supporting parents of BAME children.

If you would like to give feedback on this guidance, please email Maria Atanasoaei and title your email ‘Parental Engagement – Feedback’.

Monday, 11 September 2017 14:40

Lammy Review: Final Report

The Lammy Review: Final Report, is an independent review into the treatment of, and outcomes for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic individuals in the criminal justice system.

 

The review recommended that the YJB commission an evaluation of what had been learned from the trial of the Case Level Ethnic Disproportionality Toolkit, and identify potential actions or interventions to be taken (Recommendation 33). This was completed in November 2018, 'An Evaluation of the YJB's Case Level Ethnic Disproportionality Toolkit' and can be accessed here

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