Working with children and families

Children cannot be seen in isolation, working with families and carers is essential in sustaining desistance and supporting children in becoming important members of their community.  Many of the families whose children come into contact with the criminal justice system are vulnerable themselves and with partnership work and collaboration some of the core vulnerabilities can begin to be addressed.

This section has information and practice concerning working with families so that they are able to grow and support their children, as well as interventions for the children themselves which sustain positive outcomes.

Age: 10-17 Sex: n/a Cost: none     Aims: Meaningful supervision sessions whilst the young person is on bail Prepare the young person for the type of work that could be completed on an order Give the young person an understanding of criminal justice processes and settings An opportunity to gain information to assist with future assessments should the young…
Age: 10- upwards Sex: n/a Cost: yes     Aim: Support the evaluation of the effectiveness of a programme/intervention with offenders     Description:CRIME PICS II is a questionnaire for examining and detecting changes in offenders' attitudes to offending. It has been used by academics and by a variety of public, private and voluntary sector organisations, to evaluate the effectiveness…
Age: 10-17 Sex: male Cost: none     Aims: Provide practitioners an insight into some of the challenges faced by young fathers Support services to look at some of their own ways of working to ensure that they are inclusive to young fathers    Description:The primary focus for this piece of work has been to challenge organisational cultures and working…
Turning the Lens: How Organisational Strength Support Replication, has a focus on organisational readiness to replicate alongside flexibility to adapt to the demands of delivering interventions. It outlines what characteristics an organisation needs to be able to replicate, how their ability can be assessed and how areas for development can be identified. The briefing also covers the replication models that…
Age: 10-17 Sex: n/a Cost: none      Aims: The overall aim of Kick Smart is to encourage and engage young people in constructive leisure, in this instance football     Description:Kick Smart is a rolling football programme delivered via weekly one-hour evening sessions (5pm-6pm).Young people are not required to attend each week (unless it's a Programme Requirement as part…
Why Don’t We Listen? Parents of high-level offenders asked for help before their child’s first offence. This paper draws on research that looked at parenting interventions as a form of crime prevention. It involved a case-study of over 140 families and questionnaires with parents attending a Youth Offending Team and parents attending a voluntary parenting group. The paper considers how…
Age: 10-17 Sex: n/a Cost: yes     Aims: Improving communication skills with the aim of getting young people to engage in a personal goal setting approach Providing young people the opportunity to develop and learn new skills to increase self-esteem and enhance well being     Description: The Tuned In - Music Therapy Project is a program suitable for…
Age: n/a Sex: n/a Cost: yes   Aims: To support parents to strengthen their monitoring skills To support parents to modifying self-modelling behaviours To support parents to improve listening and praising skills To support parents to improve their understanding around peer influences To encourage positive parent/young person interactions     Description: The STOP Parenting Support Programme was originally designed for…
Description: The West Berkshire Youth Offending Team Parenting Officers run the STOP Parenting Programme. The Programme is run one per week, for 10 weeks from 6:30pm-8:30pm. All parents and carers are included. West Berkshire have offered places to parents that have limited access to their children, as a way to support positive relationships and parenting when they are able to…
Scottish Women’s Aid’s programme, Get Savi, active bystander programme for over 16s, has been running since 2010 - with the support of NUS Scotland Women's Campaign, LGBT Youth Scotland, Rape Crisis Scotland, White Ribbon Scotland and Zero Tolerance. The programme is aimed at building confidence and skills in speaking up against sexism and homophobia, and the language and attitudes that…
The Children's Society have launched a campaign aimed at young people called "Big up the Bill". The campaign aims to highlight what young people percieve as good work done by the police. A report has been published for the campaign, in which young people share examples of police staff they met who had made a lasting positive impression, and a…
Sexting: How to talk to Children about the Risks of Sexting is a resource created by NSPCC, which practitioners can use with young people to discuss ‘sexting’.
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